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A sneak peek of the Autry Museum’s Route 66 exhibit April 27, 2014

Posted by Ron Warnick in Events, History, Museums.
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The “Route 66: The Road and the Romance” exhibit at the Autry National Museum in Los Angeles won’t open until June 8.

However, Maren Dougherty, director of communications at the museum, sent images of some of the photographs, artwork and artifacts that will displayed. So here’s a bit of a preview of the exhibit.

Arthur Rothstein (1915–1985), Landscape with House, 1936, gelatin silver print. (Courtesy of The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 84.XP.1445.4).

Thomas Hart Benton (United States, 1889–1975), Boomtown, 1928, oil on canvas. (Courtesy of the Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester: Marion Stratton Gould Fund.) Art © T.H. Benton and R.P. Benton Testamentary Trusts/UMB Bank Trustee/Licensed by VAGA, New York, N.Y.

Dorothea Lange (United States, 1895-1965), Human Erosion in California (Migrant Mother), 1936, gelatin silver print (13 7/16 x 10 9/16 inches) (The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles).

Woody Guthrie’s Martin guitar, 1937. (Courtesy EMP Museum, Seattle).

66-to-Cali, Santa Monica Pier (Courtesy of the Autry National Center).

Author Jack Kerouac’s original manuscript for On the Road, 1951. (This manuscript is on loan from the collection of James S. Irsay. Photograph courtesy of Christie’s, New York. Copyright Estate of Anthony G. Sampatacacus and the Estate of Jan Kerouac).

Ed Ruscha (United States, born 1937), Dixie, Lupton, Arizona, 1962 (printed 2013). (Loan courtesy of the artist).

Jeff Brouws (United States, born 1955), Dixie, Lupton, Arizona, 1991 (printed 2013). (Courtesy of the artist and Craig Krull Gallery).

Route 66 postcard of Pasadena, Calif. (Courtesy of Joe Sonderman).

Route 66 postcard of Peach Springs, Ariz. (Courtesy of Joe Sonderman).

“Western Motel” neon sign, circa 1950. Collection of the Museum of Neon Art.

“Route 66: The Road and the Romance” runs from June 8 to Jan. 4. It will contain more than 200 artifacts “that trace the history of the route and its impact on American popular culture.”

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